The Rent Is Due. What If You Can’t Pay?

It’s the first new month since the coronavirus swept into Kentucky, and for thousands of families, that means the rent is due. Many, though, may struggle to pay that bill this month. The spreading COVID-19 pandemic has led to the shuttering of scores of business, sparking layoffs and furloughs. Renters make up about 33 percent of Kentucky’s 1.7 million households, according to data from the Metropolitan Housing Coalition. The rate is slightly higher in Jefferson County, where renters account for about 38 percent of households.

Unemployment Insurance: How It Works And How To Apply

Note: This story has been updated to reflect changes since it was originally published on March 18. The coronavirus pandemic has left  many in Kentucky jobless, and many more will lose their jobs in the coming weeks. Researchers at the Federal Reserve’s St. Louis district estimate the unemployment rate could hit 32 percent due to the coronavirus. But access to unemployment insurance has been greatly expanded for those who have lost their jobs to help ease the burden. 

Gov. Andy Beshear issued an executive order on March 25, expanding unemployment eligibility to workers not typically covered by the program, including the self-employed, independent contractors, freelance workers, substitute teachers and childcare workers employed by religious groups and nonprofits.

Insult To Injury: State Adds 32% When It Collects UK Medical Debt

Kristin Hurst walked into the Kentucky lottery office in Lexington in May of last year expecting to claim a $1,000 prize from a scratch-off lottery ticket. Instead, the lottery employee told Hurst there was a red flag on her account. From the parking lot, she made a nervous call to her fiancé. It was his ticket she was trying to cash in, but something was wrong. She had to go to the main Kentucky lottery office to find out what.